Loftus Mill, Loftus

Loftus Mill

36: Loftus Mill and the land around it belonged to Lord Zetland, who owned two thousand acres in this area.  Until 1950, the 18th century watermill played a vital part in the economy of the countryside.  In the early part of this century it also had a power saw driven by water.  The mill pond has been filled in and the mill is now a private dwelling and all that remains is a 19th century mill sluice nearby.

From “Loftus in old picture postcards” by Jean Wiggins. Reproduced by permission.

Congregational Church, Loftus

Congregational Church35: Congregationalism in Loftus dates back to 1827 when the Ebenezer Chapel was erected, but for many years its inconvenience and unsuitability for progressive work crippled the efforts of the church and school.  In October 1906 a start was made to raise funds for a new building on a prominent site in the centre of the town. Foundation stones were laid in April 1906 and the handsome, conspicuous building was opened for worship on the 6 December.  An outstanding feature of the building is an open-air pulpit designed for outdoor work in the summer.  The Pastor, Reverend T. Colledge, was educated at Hackney College, London and entered upon his first pastorate at Loftus in June 1907.

From “Loftus in old picture postcards” by Jean Wiggins. Reproduced by permission.

Zetland Road, Loftus

Zetland Road

34: In this postcard of Zetland Road on the left are Leggs, ladies and gents clothes; Eatons, Loftus Ltd., furniture and fancy goods; The Commercial Hotel – upstairs to the rooms and a restaurant owned by Mr. Wood; and John Dawson Robinson, hardware.  To the right are Moores, grocery; Hector Garton, shoes; Lengs, ladies and gents hairdresser; Races, bakers; and Maggie Rivett, hairdressers.

From “Loftus in old picture postcards” by Jean Wiggins. Reproduced by permission.

The Webster Family

The Webster Family

33. The Webster Family: Richard Henry Webster was a painter and decorator.  He lived at 15 Tyne Street, Loftus and had a shop on the corner of Gladstone Street.  He also owned the building which is now the Post Office.  Over one side of the doors was the inscription ‘Richard Henry Webster, Painter and Decorator’, which time has now obliterated.  His son, Henry Isaac Webster, was proprietor of The Golden Lion Hotel and he built Windsor Terrace.  He also built the off-licence in the Market Place.  Later he went to live at Kenilworth House.  His son, Richard Arthur Webster, is pictured here with his family about 1919.  His daughter, May, owned the off-licence and Kenilworth after his death.

From “Loftus in old picture postcards” by Jean Wiggins. Reproduced by permission.

Kenilworth House

Kenilworth House

“32: Kenilworth, now an old people’s home, was once the residence of the Webster family.  Before the Websters owned Kenilworth House it belonged to the Bacons of ‘Hoggett and Bacon Solicitors’, who moved to the premises next to the Town Hall.  The next-door neighbour at this time in Westfield House was Mr. W. B. Coxon, who was a mines manager.  He was the proud owner of a Studebaker motorcar with wooden spoked wheels and a chauffeur, Mr. Ernie Harper, complete with uniform.”

From “Loftus in old picture postcards” by Jean Wiggins. Reproduced by permission.

Duncan Place

Duncan Place

“31: The cottage at the north end of Duncan Place used to be called ‘Rhubarb Hall’ when its real name was ‘Hope Cottage’.  There was nothing below Duncan Place except a windmill owned by Mr. Thomas Swales.  His business was so profitable that he decided to build a second, but unfortunately for him there was not enough wind for two and he had to pull it down!  The Junior Schools in Duncan Place, 1866-1870, were built to house 260 boys and 260 girls.  This building is now the Youth and Community Centre.”

From “Loftus in old picture postcards” by Jean Wiggins. Reproduced by permission.

The Forge, Loftus

The Forge

“30: The Forge, High Street, Loftus.  Built by Lord Zetland in what was then his timberyard with his estate office nearby at the turn of the century, the Forge and its adjoining cottage was rented to Mr. John Wrightson by Lord Zetland for £15 per year.  To the left of this photograph is John Ward Hopper, who was apprenticed to John Wrightson, who is also thought to be in this photograph.  The Forge was later bought by Mr. Harry Wrightson in the 1950s.”

From “Loftus in old picture postcards” by Jean Wiggins. Reproduced by permission.

Grinkle Station

Grinkle Station

“29: Grinkle Station.  Charles Mark Palmer bought Grinkle Park from Squire Middleton to use as a shooting box, but he was also well aware of the value of the ironstone seam that ran beneath his estate and soon opened Grinkle Mine.  The railway was very useful for transporting his stone to the works, but the station was not near his home as might be expected.  It was at the Loftus end of Easington and it is said that when Charles Palmer arrived at the station en route for Grinkle he was met by a ’four in hand or two in hand carriage with a groom’ to take him on the last stage of his journey.”

From “Loftus in old picture postcards” by Jean Wiggins. Reproduced by permission.

East Loftus

East Loftus

“28: This picture is of East Loftus.  The building with the gable end to the left is the common lodging house known locally as the ‘Pad ‘n’ Can’.  For your nightly payment of 6d you got a pad (bed) and a can of hot water in the morning.  Travelling people, miners and labourers from all over the country used the house.  It was said to be so full that people ‘slept on clotheslines’.  East Loftus was often known as ‘Little Ireland’, because it had an overwhelming population of Irish migrants.”

From “Loftus in old picture postcards” by Jean Wiggins. Reproduced by permission.

Victoria Terrace

Victoria Terrace

“27: Victoria Terrace, about 1900, enjoyed an open aspect at the front, looking out over farmland.  The piece of land with trees to the left of this photograph was always known as the ‘Nursery’.  One old lady told me it was because children always played there.  I don’t know if this is true, maybe it was named when the young trees were planted.  There is a candle factory or tallow house at the back of Victoria Terrace.  It was closed around 1871 when East Crescent was being built, because of the foul smell emanating from the boiling fat.”

From “Loftus in old picture postcards” by Jean Wiggins. Reproduced by permission.